BFCM 2020 DISCOUNT 15% OFF BEDWETTING ALARMS (AUTO APPLIED AT CHECKOUT)

The cost of bedwetting: to you and the environment

by Karen Radford 2 min read

The environmental aspects of stopping bedwetting

Many parents and caregivers will use plastic-lined disposable diapers or pull-ups for their bedwetting child. The use of these pull-ups can continue up to the age of 10 and beyond. Calculating from the age of 5 (when bedwetting is considered to be a problem worth solving) through the age of 10 years, using one pull-up per day, 2200 pull-ups will be used by one bedwetting child in that time. In the USA, for example, there are approximately 7-9 million bedwetters over the age of 5 years, and, with one pull-up per day per child, that is around 3,000,000,000 pull-ups used per year in the USA. From 5 to 10 years there will be approximately 18,000,000,000 pull-ups used. In fact many children use more than one pull-up at night, and so the figure is conservative.

Most households simply dispose of them in the normal rubbish collection system, and they end up in land-fills. Apart from being a public health hazard, these pull-ups, because they are wrapped tightly in their plastic covering, have been estimated to take 500 years to decompose in a modern land-fill. The cumulative quantity of pull-ups in land-fill is staggering.

At around $1.00 each, the cost is $365.00 per year, or $2,190.00 during the period of bedwetting. Some families may have to spend more, and some less, but that is the average.

Moreover there are suggestions from some professionals that using a pull-up actually prolongs the period of bedwetting, because the child has little motivation for change.

Therefore, using a DRI Sleeper® bedwetting alarm costing around $80 is saving the family up to $2,000, and there is evidence that a child's self-esteem increases significantly.

Perhaps even more important is the fact that a bedwetting alarm can significantly reduce the accumulation of billions of pull-ups in land-fills, and their legacy of waste that can be there for up to 500 years.

 

Choose the alarm that is right for you

Karen Radford
Karen Radford


Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in The Bedwetting Blog

Night toilet training….in times of pandemic
Night toilet training….in times of pandemic

by Karen Radford 1 min read

Read More
How do Enuresis Alarms help solve childrens bedwetting?
How do Enuresis Alarms help solve childrens bedwetting?

by Karen Radford 4 min read

Enuresis alarms use Learning by Association to teach a child to respond to their bladder signals. The feeling of a full bladder becomes associated with the sound of an alarm which wakes the child up. Once the association is learned, the feeling of a full bladder will be enough to wake the child without the alarm.
Read More
Deep-sleeping children: do alarms work?
Deep-sleeping children: do alarms work?

by Karen Radford 5 min read

Many parents have been told their child wets the bed because they're a deep sleeper. Find out why this advice isn't right, and get tricks and tips to help your heavy sleeping child learn to have dry nights.

More

Read More